Detroit AR15 Owner Stops Porch Pirate, Sight of Rifle is Sufficient

Image screenshot from Twitter, cropped and scaled by Dean Weingarten

USA –- (AmmoLand.com) – In the viral video posted on Twitter, the armed resident saw a porch pirate taking a package from the porch. The resident grabs an AR15 rifle and confronts the veranda pirate.

Link to the video on boxden.com

The pirate returns the package, the pirate’s accomplice drives off and the pirate runs away. It’s a “happy ending”. A lot could have gone wrong.

It almost certainly happened in Detroit. It is said to have happened on February 15th. There was a lot of snow on the ground in Detroit on February 15th, so the weather is fine.

A Freerepublic commentator identified the location as Detroit. MotorCityBuck wrote it was likely a suburb of Detroit, Redford Township:

Looks like Suburban Detroit. Redford Township would be my guess.

This correspondent suspects that the pirate is right-handed because he uses his right hand to stabilize everything that is in the front hoodie pocket when he comes up the driveway and later when he runs away. A cell phone also appears to be in his right back pocket. It would be unusual to put a cell phone in a pocket.

The homeowner let the pirates get too close. He only held the rifle in one hand. Disarmament could well have been attempted and would very likely have been successful. With just one hand on the rifle, the ability to use either the muzzle or the butt as an impact weapon is neutralized.

The video does not make it clear what is in the front pocket of the hoodie. It’s hard enough for the pirate to feel the need to stabilize it when he walks towards him and runs away again. This correspondent couldn’t tell what it was.

A retired officer I know watched the video and said it was probably a pistol in the front pocket because of the weight and the need to stabilize it. He said guns don’t print well through heavy hoodie material. The outline in the right back pocket resembles a telephone.

Screenshot, scaled, cropped, text and arrow by Dean Weingarten

If you are armed and face a criminal, do not let him come within two meters of you. Make sure you are in control of your weapon. If it’s a long gun, you should have two hands on it.

While Detroit has had poor police response times, they have improved quite a bit. The homeowner likely has the local pulse of what is going on in their local criminal justice system.

He may have thought calling the police wasn’t worth the effort. Additionally, draining the culprit is a much cleaner and faster solution than trying to keep a porch pirate at the gun point on a snowy driveway when no other weapon has been seen.

Each situation is unique and may require a slightly different response. The Veranda Board never threatened Sagittarius. The pirate followed up pretty quickly. This demonstrates the ability of a known firearm to act as a serious deterrent.

The shooter never had to point the AR15 at anyone or verbally threaten the veranda pirate.

The desired compliance occurred because the veranda boarder was caught red-handed. He knew it and feared possible retribution.

In a rational society, such a monstrous, immoral act as piracy on the porch would be vigorously investigated and prosecuted.

Telephone records could be checked for use within a hundred meters of the house. This could lead to the vehicle, which could lead to the identity of the perpetrators.

If the Detroit system is having a hard time investigating murders seriously, piracy on the porch is at the bottom of the priority list.

About Dean Weingarten:

Dean Weingarten was a peace officer, military officer, served on the University of Wisconsin’s pistol team for four years, and was first certified as a firearms safety instructor in 1973. He taught the concealed carry course in Arizona for fifteen years until the Constitution’s goal of carry was achieved. He holds degrees in meteorology and mining engineering and retired from the Department of Defense after a 30 year career in research, development, testing and evaluation for the Army.

Dean Weingarten

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